The Tam Institute for Jewish Studies at Emory University banner
Newsletter Faculty & Staff Graduate Undergraduate Alumni Affiliated Programs Events Resources Contact

Events

Home

Tenenbaum Family Lecture Series

 

 

 

 

Spring 2013 Calendar of Events

E-mail to subscribe to our events mailing list!

 

"Jews, Immigration, and Ethnic Conflict in the New South"
- Marni Davis (Assistant Professor of History, Georgia State University)

Jews were but one group among many immigrant communities in the South at the turn of the twentieth century. This talk will situate the southern Jewish experience within broader phenomenon of immigrant life in the New South by examining several instances of southern Jews coming into legal conflict with other immigrants.

Part of the Series Jews and "Others" Confront the Law in Atlanta, supported by a generous grant from the American Academy for Jewish Research.

Friday, February 1st, 2013
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Bowden Hall 323 (Majors Room)


“More French than the French:  The Algerian Jewish Resistance during World War II, Its Crucial Role in the Allied Landing, and Its Betrayal by the Americans” - Norman Stillman (Schusterman/Josey Chair in Judaic History, University of Oklahoma)

The Second World War was a traumatic turning point in the history of Maghrebi Jewry even as it was in the history of all Jews. With the fall of France in June 1940, Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco came under the rule of the anti-Semitic Vichy regime, and more than 100,000 Algerian Jews, some of them by now third generation Frenchmen, were stripped of their citizenship and like their coreligionists in Germany in the wake of the Nuremberg laws, they were reduced from citizens to subjects. Despite two years under the harsh, discriminatory Vichy laws, Algerian Jews remained loyal to the French Republican ideals. On the night of November 7–8, 1942, a small band of young Algerian Jews who formed the core of the Resistance greatly facilitated the Allied landing and prevented large numbers of casualties. Their heroism was betrayed by the American special envoy, Robert Murphy, who promptly reinstated captured Vichy officials and their anti-Semitic laws. This paper will examine this complex story reconstructed through archives, memoirs, and conflicting accounts as part of a book chapter Professor Stillman is writing on Jewish community and society in North Africa in the modern period. 

This Faculty-Graduate Seminar is part of the Tenenbaum Family Lecture Series in Judaic Studies.

Cosponsored by the Laney Graduate School, Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Graduate Division of Religion, Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts, Department of History, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, Department of Religion, and Program in Linguistics.

Tuesday, February 12th
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Jones Room, Woodruff Library

 

“Grapes of Wrath or Concord?  Muslim-Jewish Relationships in French Cinema since the Second Intifada” - Dinah Assouline Stillman (Instructor of French, University of Oklahoma)

While most of the newcomers to France during the first half of the twentieth century fulfilled the Republican vision of assimilation, the later Jewish and Muslim immigrants who came from the Maghreb during the period of decolonization and post-colonization have had far more mixed and complex responses to norms of the Métropole. Until the early 1990s, their close cohabitation was generally peaceful, but events in the Middle East and in particular the First and Second Intifada, plus the introduction of Arab satellite television, caused a sea change in inter-ethnic relations.  This talk will consider how French recent cinema accounts for the new relationships between Jews and Muslims in France.

Cosponsored by the Department of French and Italian, Department of Film & Media Studies, and the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies.

Thursday, February 14th
4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Bowden Hall 323 (Majors Room)

 

“Sharks and Marks: Sholem Aleichem and the Swindles of Modernity” -
Miriam Udel (Assistant Professor of Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture, Emory University)

Sponsored by REEES and The Tam Institute for Jewish Studies.

Friday, February 22nd
9:00 -10:30 a.m.
Candler Library 212

 

“After the Holocaust: The Prosecution of Nazi Crimes Against German Jews in West Germany, 1945-1949” -
Edith Raim (Professor of History at Augsberg/Institut fuer Zeitgeschichte, Munich)

Part of the lecture series "America and the Germans: Conlict and Cooperation," presented by the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies with the financial support of the Claus M. Halle Institute for Global Learning and the German Foreign Office through the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

Cosponsored by The Department of History, The Department of German Studies, The German Cultural Center of Atlanta, and the Center for the Study of Law and Religion.

Wednesday, February 27th
7:00 p.m.
Oxford Presentation Auditorium, Oxford Road Building
(Parking available in the Oxford Road Building deck)

 

“Israel's Islamists: Explaining Islamic Political Activism in the Jewish State” -
Lawrence Rubin (Assistant Professor, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Georgia Institute of Technology)

This presentation looks at the Islamic Movement in Israel and seeks to understand the major causes for both the growth of Islamic political activism and its fragmentation.

This seminar is cosponsored by the LaBelle Birnbaum Tenenbaum Enrichment Fund, the Department of Political Science, and the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies.

Friday, March 1st, 2013
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Candler Library 212

 

“'To Be or Not to Be?': The Emergence of the Israelites and the Formation of their Identity” -
Avraham Faust (Professor, Bar-Ilan University)

Part of the Mediterranean Archaeology Lecture Series.

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013
3:00 p.m.
Reception Hall, Carlos Museum

 

“Perspectivism in Jewish Studies: Between Texts and Methods” -
Moshe Idel (Max Cooper Professor Emeritus of Jewish Thought,Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Much has been made of the differences in method and style between American and Israeli approaches to academic Jewish studies. Grounded in a career-long observation of both areas, Professor Idel maps the ground traveled and offers critical analysis of the way forward.

Cosponsored by the Evans Director Fund of TIJS, the LaBelle Birnbaum Tenenbaum Enrichment Fund, and the Department of Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies.

Monday, March 18th, 2013
12:30 p.m.
Candler Library 212

 

“Hindu Thought in Hebrew Words: How Indian Thought Influenced Medieval Jewish Mysticism -
Moshe Idel (Max Cooper Professor Emeritus of Jewish Thought, Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Professor Moshe Idel is the most prominent living scholar of Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism. In this talk, he considers the arrival of Hindu and Buddhist literature to Medieval Europe and its impact on Jewish mysticism. Two primary areas in which this influence can be felt are the visualization of colors in Kabbalistic prayer and the view of the world as maya (illusory) in Hasidism. This ground breaking paper considers a case of religious diffusion and sharing that has scarcely been subjected to scholarly scrutiny and sets an important new agenda for comparative research in religious mysticism.

This lecture is presented by The Evans Director Fund of TIJS and the Hightower Fund and is cosponsored by the Department of Religion, the Graduate Division of Religion, the Candler School of Theology, the Emory Collaborative for Contemplative Studies, and the Emory-Tibet Partnership.

Monday, March 18th, 2013
7:30 p.m.
White Hall 207

 

“Excavating the Fortress of Elah and the Battle over King David” -
Michael Hasel (Professor, Southern Adventist University)

Part of the Mediterranean Archaeology Lecture Series.

Sunday, April 14th, 2013
3:00 p.m.
Reception Hall, Carlos Museum

 

2013 Rothschild Seminar:

“Jewish Women's Organizations and the Challenge of Race Relations in Atlanta and Beyond” -
Karla Goldman (Sol Drachler Professor of Social Work, University of Michigan)

As Hadassah and the Women of Reform Judaism celebrate their 100th anniversaries, Karla Goldman discusses the central role of Jewish women’s organizations in American Jewish life. Looking at Atlanta and other southern communities, she will examine the ways in which women’s organizations created and framed Jewish communal life and responded to the pressures of social and racial change in American and Southern life.

2013 Rothschild Seminar and part of the Seminar Series in Jewish Studies. Part of the Series Jews and “Others” Confront the Law in Atlanta, Supported by a Generous Grant from the American Academy for Jewish Research.

Generously supported by the Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild Memorial Endowment Fund and cosponsored by the Department of Religion; the Graduate Division of Religion; and the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Monday, April 15th, 2013
4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
Ethics Center Commons, CST 102

 

“Leo Frank and "Our Country's National Crime" Lynching as America's History” -
Hasia Diner (Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History, New York University)

This lecture marks the 100th anniversary of the 1913 trial of Leo Frank.

Jointly sponsored by the William Bremen Jewish Heritage Museum and the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies.

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013
7:00 p.m.
The William Bremen Jewish Heritage Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

E-mail to subscribe to our events mailing list!



Newsletter | Faculty & Staff | Graduate | Undergraduate | Alumni | Affiliated Programs | Events | Resources | Contact

Jewish Studies home | Emory College | Emory University


The Tam Institute for Jewish Studies | 204 Candler Library | 550 Asbury Circle | Emory University | Atlanta, GA 30322 | Campus Mail Stop 1580-002-2AD | Phone: 404-727-6301 | Fax: 404-727-3297 |

Please direct questions or comments to: mmibab@emory.edu
Copyright © Emory University
Last updated: August 23, 2016

 

 

JS homepage Emory homepage