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Graduate Spring 2012 Courses

JS 530R-000: Biblical Literacy: Book of Job

JS 530R-001: Biblical Literacy: Hebrew Exegesis

JS 560R-000: Approaches to Jewish History: Introduction to Judaism

JS 561R-000: Methods in Jewish Studies: Jewish Mysticism, Text and Context

JS 597R-00P: Directed Study
JS 598R-00P: Thesis/Exam Preparation
JS 730-000: Topics in Jewish Studies: German Historiography After 1945

JS 730-001: Topics in Jewish Studies: America and the Germans: 1871-1990
JS 730-002: Topics in Jewish Studies: Brazilian Race & Ethnicity in Comparative Perspective

JS 730-003: Topics in Jewish Studies: Midrash

 

 

JS 530R-000: Biblical Literacy: Book of Job
Newsom, Time: Tu 2:30-5:30 p.m., Max: 5, Candler School of Theology 549

 

Course description: Detailed exegetical and hermeneutical explorations of the book of Job, including modern responses to the issues raised by the book.

Texts:

  • R. Doran, L. Keck, J. McCann, C. Newsom, The New Interpreter's Bible, 1 & 2 Maccabees, Jobs, Psalms, Vol. 4 (Abingdon Press, 1996)
  • E. Wiesel, The Trial of God (Schocken, 1995)

 

 

JS 530R-001: Biblical Literacy: Hebrew Exegesis
Newsom, Time: W, F 9:30-10:50 a.m., Max: 3, Candler School of Theology 401

 

Course description:An introduction to exegesis of the Hebrew Bible using the original language and with reference to selected texts from representative genres in the Old Testament.

 

Texts:

  • Bible Society Staff, Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (American Bible Society, 1997)
  • F. Brown, S.R. Driver, C. Briggs, The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon (Hendrickson, 1996)
  • P. Kelley, D. Mynatt, T. Crawford, The Masorah of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Eerdmans, 1998)
  • B. Arnold, J. Choi, A Guide to Biblical Hebrew Syntax, (Cambridge University Press, 2003)

 

 

JS 560R-000: Approaches to Jewish History: Introduction to Judaism
Blumenthal
, Time: Tu 2:30-5:30 p.m., Max: 20, Candler School of Theology 252

 

Course description: The purpose of this course is to provide students for the Christian ministry an education with a historical, theological, and practical introduction to Judaism and the Jewish community. Accordingly, the course is divided into four parts: the secular forms of Jewish identity, the religious forms of Jewish identity, the Holocaust as the formative drama of contemporary Jewish life, and A.J. Heschel as a representative Jewish theologian.

 

Texts:

 

  • Bible (any translation)
  • H. Wouk, This Is My God
  • E. Wiesel, Night
  • A.J. Heschel, God in Search of Man

 

Material on Blackboard (be sure to bring computer to class or print it out for yourself):

 

  • D. Blumenthal, Essays for Christian-Jewish Understanding
  • D. Blumenthal, "Timeline of Jewish History"
  • S. Dubnow, "The Doctrine of Jewish Nationalism" (excerpt)
  • A. Hertzberg, The Zionist Idea (excerpts)
  • S. Woocher, American Jewish Civil Religion
  • D. Blumenthal, "Memory and Meaning in the Shadow of the Holocaust"
  • D. Blumenthal, "Repentance and Forgiveness"
  • A Theological Understanding of the Relationship Between Christians and Jews, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

 

Supplemental Reading (on reserve, though you may wish to buy some of these):

  • L. Dawidowicz, The War Against the Jews
  • S. Dubnow, Nationalism and History
  • A. Hertzberg, The Zionist Idea
  • E. Evans, The Provincials
  • A.J. Heschel, Who Is Man?
  • J. Telushkin, Jewish Literacy

Particulars: No prerequisites. The teaching method is discussion; students will have to prepare all readings. There will be a field trip. Final exam will be take home, choice of questions, short essay. Doctoral students will be expected to do the supplemental reading.

 

 

 

JS 561R-000: Methods in Jewish Studies: Jewish Mysticism, Text and Context
Seeman, Time: M 1-4, Max: 20, Candler Library 212

 

Course description: This seminar introduces students to critical issues in the methodologies and disciplines that make up contemporary Jewish Studies. It does not presume background in any specific field or discipline and is open to all doctoral students who wish to learn about Jewish Studies broadly or about the topic of Jewish mysticism from a variety of different perspectives. Methods in Jewish Studies is also a required course for the Jewish Studies Certificate Program and is meant to build collegiality and shared experience among students with Jewish Studies interests from any department or program in the Laney Graduate School. We will have frequent class visits from scholars representing different Jewish Studies disciplines, and will also supplement class with films and in-class text study.

 

Why Jewish Mysticism? I have chosen to organize the class in Spring 2012 around the study of Jewish Mysticism because it is a topic that has been approached from an extremely wide variety of perspectives, including history, ethnography, gender studies, theology, literary theory and philosophy. It is also a topic that spans all historical periods and has many comparative dimensions with other cultural and religious traditions. Whether or not they have a primary interest in mysticism, students from across Emory will be able to find methodological and theoretical dimensions of this course that relate to their own chosen areas of Jewish Studies. We will focus on secondary (and some primary) literature representing many of the major disciplines represented in Jewish Studies as well as different geographical regions and periods: from 11th century North Africa to 13th century Spain, 19th century Poland and 20th century Israel and the United States.

 

Texts:

 

  • Gershom Scholem, Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (Schoken Books, 1995)
  • Diana Lobel, Between Mysticism and Philosophy: Sufi Language of Religious Experience in Yehuda Ha-Levi's Kuzari (SUNY Press, 2000)
  • Melila Hellner-Eshed, A River Flows from Eden: The Language of Mystical Experience in the Zohar (Stanford University Press, 2011)
  • Shaul Magid, From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic Kabbalah (Indiana Univ. Press, 2008)
  • J.H. Chajes, Between Worlds: Dybbuks, Exorcists and Early Modern Judaism (Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 2011)
  • Chava Weissler, Voices of the Matriarchs: Listening to the Prayers of Early Modern Jewish Women (Beacon Press, 1999)
  • Moshe Idel, Old World, New Mirrors: Jewish Mysticism and Twentieth Century Thought (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009)
  • Yonathan Garb, The Chosen Will Become Herds: Studies in Twentieth Century Kabbalah (Yale University Press, 2009)
  • Yoram Bilu, The Saint's Impresarios: Dreamers, Healers, and Hole Men in Israel's Urban Periphery (Academic Studies Press, 2009)

 

JS 597R-00P: Directed Study
Faculty, Time: TBA

 

 

 

 

JS 598R-00P: Thesis/Exam Preparation
Faculty, Time: TBA

 

 

 

JS 730-000: Topics in Jewish Studies: German Historiography After 1945 (same as HIST 585-004)
Eckert, Time: M 4:00-7:00, MAX: 12 (JS 6, HIST 6) Candler Library 124

Course description: This seminar investigates key controversies within the German historical profession from the end of the Second World War until the present. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with central questions in German history while exploring issues and approaches in historical method. Beyond an examination of the specific historiographical questions at stake in these debates and a reconsideration of the texts that ignited the controversies, the seminar will provide students with a broad framework to trace and analyze the shifting place of National Socialism and the Holocaust within German historiography. Because many of these debates - particularly the Fischer controversy, the debate about the German Sonderweg, and the Goldhagen controversy - involved historians from outside Germany, the course will also highlight the complex positionality of writing and thinking about German history from abroad.

 

Texts:

  • Gershom Scholem, Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (Schoken Books, 1995)
  • Diana Lobel, Between Mysticism and Philosophy: Sufi Language of Religious Experience in Yehuda Ha-Levi's Kuzari (State University of New York Press, 2000)
  • Melila Hellner-Eshed, A River Flows from Eden: The Language of Mystical Experience in the Zohar (Stanford University Press, 2011)
  • Shaul Magid, From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic Kabbalah (Indiana University Press, 2008)
  • J.H. Chajes, Between Worlds: Dybbuks, Exorcists and Early Modern Judaism (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011)
  • Chava Weissler, Voices of the Matriarchs: Listening to the Prayers of Early Modern Jewish Women (Beacon Press, 1999)
  • Moshe Idel, Old World, New Mirrors: Jewish Mysticism and Twentieth Century Thought (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009)
  • Yonathan Garb, The Chosen will Become Herds: Studies in Twentieth Century Kabbalah (Yale University Press, 2009)
  • Yoram Bilu, The Saint's Impressarios: Dreamers, Healers and Holy Men in Israel's Urban Periphery (Academic Studies Press, 2009)

 

 

JS 730-001: Topics in Jewish Studies: America and the Germans: 1871-1990
Wilhelm, Time: Th 4:30-7:30, MAX: 4, Candler Library 212

Course description:
During the Cold War, the relations between West Germany and the US had been extremely close: America’s support was crucial for the re-building of Germany’s society, polity and economy. The United States guaranteed West Germany’s security at the frontline of the Cold War in Europe. Although processes of Americanization or Westernization have shaped postwar Germany dramatically, German-American relations and mutual perceptions have been idealized in this period for political reasons.

The Seminar will take a closer look at the relationship of the two nations, their mutual perceptions and cultural encounters from the emergence of a German nation state in 1871 to German unification in 1990 and the 2+4 treaty, which concluded the postwar era and explore why historians today talk about a “conflict history” if they address transatlantic history. Besides immigration, popular culture, the World Wars as well as political, social and economic history, the seminar will have a particular focus on the Jewish topics within this relationship. Such topics include, immigration, Anti-semitism and Anti-Americanism, Propaganda, Nazism’s impact on the German ethnic community, the emergence of a refugee community, the Holocaust, postwar-planning, Displaced Persons, “denazification”, restitution, Germany’s relationship with Israel and the American Jewish community and memory.

Texts:

  • course packet
  • William Kelleher Storey: Writing History: A Guide for Students, Oxford UP: New York, Oxford, 2008.

 

JS 730-002: Topics in Jewish Studies: Brazilian Race & Ethnicity in Comparative Perspective (same as HIST 561R-000, ILA 790-000, ANT 585-004) Bowden Hall 323
Lesser, Time: W 1:00-4:00, MAX: 12 (JS 3, HIST 3, ILA 3, ANT 3)

Course description:
This course will explore the debates over race and ethnicity in nineteenth and twentieth century Brazil, within a comparative national context.  The focus will be on how definitions of "nation,"ethnicity, race, and "Brazilianness" (brasilidade) have been contested by both majority and minority groups.   While much of the course will focus on Brazilians of African descent, we will also discuss Jews, Nikkei (Brazilians of Japanese descent) and Syrian-Lebanese (Brazilians of Middle Eastern descent). 


Particulars: The major writing assignment for this course will include will focus on each student’s research interests via a historiographical essay.  There will also be short weekly essays and weekly discussions of primary documents.

Texts: The texts for the class will come from a range of disciplines including history, anthropology, public health, and ethnomusicology. In addition, a number of novels will be required reading.  Probable texts include:

  • Leo Spitzer, Lives in Between: Assimilation and Marginality in Austria, Brazil, West Africa, 1780-1945
  • João Jose Reis, Slave Rebellion in Brazil: The Muslim Uprising of 1835 in Bahia (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995)
  • Paulina Alberto, Terms of Inclusion: Black Intellectuals in Twentieth-century Brazil (University of North Carolina Press, 2011)
  • Idelber Avelar and Christopher Dunn, eds.  Brazilian Popular Music and Citizenship (Duke University Press, 2011)
  • John Karam, Another Arabesque: Syrian-Lebanese Ethnicity in Neoliberal Brazil (Temple University Press, 2006)
  • Mariza de Carvalho Soares, People of Faith: Slavery and African Catholics in Eighteenth-Century Rio de Janeiro (Duke University Press, 2011)
  • Jessica Gregg, Virtually Virgins: Sexual Strategies and Cervical Cancer in Recife, Brazil (Stanford University Press, 2003)
  • Thomas D. Rogers, The Deepest Wounds: A Labor and Environmental History of Sugar in Northeast Brazil (University of North Carolina Press, 2010)
  • Karen Tei Yamashita Circle K Cycles (Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2001)
  • Jerry Davila, Hotel Trpico: Brazil and the Challenge of African Decolonization, 1950-1980 (Duke University Press, 2011)

 

JS 730-003: Topics in Jewish Studies: Midrash
Blumenthal
, Time: Th 2:30-5:30 p.m., MAX: 15, Candler Library 204C

Course description: Midrash is the key form of biblical interpretation in rabbinic Judaism. It is also one of the main genres of rabbinic literature. This course will study closely one text: Bereshit Rabba. We will read through the text of chapters 39-41 in Hebrew. Goals: To give participants a taste of midrashic text in the original Hebrew, to introduce students to basic definitions and terms, to teach value-concepts as an analytical tool, and to compile a list of midrashic literary techniques. The basic thesis of the seminar is that midrash is not "exegesis" but "Torah," that is, a literary method for creating a new worldview.

Texts:

  • JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh: Pocket Edition (Jewish Publication Society, 2003)
  • Bereshit Rabba (on Blackboard)
  • D. Boyarin, Intertextuality and the Reading of Midrash, esp. Chapters 1, 2, 5 (on reserve)
  • M. Fishbane, Garments of Torah (on reserve)

Prerequisites: Ability to read and understand Hebrew. You will need to read and translate. You may use the English to prepare but you may NOT bring it to class. This is a course for graduate students; qualified undergraduates may also attend.

 

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Last updated: December 14, 2011

 

 

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